Basel Fasnacht 2015: I’m still finding confetti…

This week in Basel it was Fasnacht!

Barfüsserplatz on the Monday of Fasnacht 2015

Barfüsserplatz on the Monday of Fasnacht 2015

Fasnacht is the spring festival in Basel – it’s a bit like Mardis Gras, and takes place a week after Shrove Tuesday. It lasts exactly 72 hours, running from 4am on the Monday to 4am on the Thursday. It’s INSANE. Some Fasnacht facts (Fas-facts?) I’ve been told over the last few days which I can’t confirm but sound good:

  • 1 in 7 Baslers is an active “Fasnachtler” – Fasnachtlers are members of the marching bands which patrol the city in full costume throughout the festival.
  • Some people stay up for the WHOLE 72 hours. (how???)
  • Fasnacht is supposed to “chase away the ghosts of the winter” – the sun has been out in Basel this week, so clearly it works.

The official Fasnacht website doesn’t offer a lot of clues as to its origins, other than that, “the terrible earthquake of 1356 which destroyed large parts of the city and many official archives”, so there’s no real record of the festival’s beginning.

The official badge, or "blaggedde", of Fasnacht 2015.

The official badge, or “blaggedde”, of Fasnacht 2015.

The profits from these badges help to fund Fasnacht, so it’s bad form to be seen without one.  You can even buy a gold version! The design this year is based on the new tower at Roche, where I work. A surprising choice, as not all the locals are big fans of the tower; it’s set to be the tallest building in Switzerland when it’s completed, so it’s pretty big on the Basel skyline.

Before Basel Fasnacht is Chienbäse, which takes place in Liestal. “Cheinbäse” is the name for the bundles of pinewood which are traditionally set alight and carried through the old cobbled streets of the town.

liestal cheinbäse fasnacht 2015 fire

These seem pretty impressive. Then you see the bonfires:

liestal cheinbäse fasnacht 2015 fire

liestal cheinbäse fasnacht 2015 fireIt gets pretty warm! The procession gets on for about an hour, with the bonfires getting taller and hotter until the whole street is filled with smoke. This happens the Sunday night before Fasnacht begins in Basel, so I left smelling of woodsmoke and opted to stay up all night for the 4am start.

Fasnacht in Basel begins with Morgenstraich.

Crowds arriving for Morgenstreich

Crowds arriving for Morgenstreich

At 4am on the Monday of Fasnacht, all the lights in the city are switched off, and the laterns belonging to the various “cliques” are illuminated. They then parade around the city into the morning, playing the traditional Fasnacht tune on piccolos.

Lanterns at Morgenstreich

Lanterns at Morgenstreich

basel fasnacht 2015 morgenstraichThe next day, things get very different. Large brass marching bands assemble to play Guggenmusik, often discordant versions of pop songs or standards (I heard the Pink Panther Theme A LOT). Waggis appear, showering everyone with confetti, flowers, and increasingly strange gifts – on separate occasions, I saw fruit, cuddly toys, scarves, cakes, lighters, cans of cider, leeks, potatoes and bulbs of garlic handed out. In my bag at the end of the day I had sheets and sheets of stickers, a white rose, a bag of popcorn and a lemon.

Fasnacht Basel 2015

Fasnacht Basel 2015

The best clique I saw all weekend

The best clique I saw all weekend

The Kappelijoch waggis - a group of waggis had set up camp in the small chapel on the bridge between Grossbasel and Kleinbasel. Get too close and you might get a bunch of flowers, or a handful of "räppli" (confetti) down the back of your neck...

The Kappelijoch waggis – a group of waggis had set up camp in the small chapel on the bridge between Grossbasel and Kleinbasel. Get too close and you might get a bunch of flowers, or a handful of “räppli” (confetti) down the back of your neck…

An impromptu Gugge concert takes place in a side street, featuring the ever popular dudelsack! (or bagpipes, in English)

An impromptu Gugge concert takes place in a side street, featuring the ever popular dudelsack! (or bagpipes, in English)

Many of the costumes and lanterns featured jokes, mostly about politics or social issues. Being written in the Swiss German dialect, the majority of these went right over my head. However, I think everyone can appreciate this topless Putin costume:

From afar...

From afar…

It's the raincoat.

It’s the raincoat.

After an exhausting weekend, I was back to work on Tuesday – no 72 hour partying for me. Despite the rain, I can definitely see why the locals call Fasnacht die drey scheenschte Dääg, or “the three most beautiful days”.

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